Why Being Technology Agnostic Works

February 18, 2020

Being technology agnostic means that instead of adopting the “latest” tech, you choose the best technology for your unique context, goals, and people. 

 

We all know that technology changes constantly, and that in order to stay competitive and meet the needs of clients, customers, and employees, we have to keep up with those changes. There’s immense pressure on organizations to spend money and time on upgrades. However, it’s important to remember that technology is a tool, and not every tool – even the latest or most popular tool –  may be the best fit for your context. 

This is the essence of being technology agnostic; there’s no “one size fits all” solution.

Being technology agnostic means first looking at the bigger picture, evaluating your specific needs, challenges, and priorities, and then selecting the best match to meet those needs. It also means evaluating whether the technology you already have is simply not being used to its full capacity or if you need to switch to a different option. Technologies seldom disappear - they usually expand their capabilities and adapt into something more advanced, so it may be more important to adjust to the changes in what you already have. 

For example, you may have found that your employees are often not completing their required online training courses and some have complained that they don’t find the courses are delivered in a very user-friendly format. You’ve heard of a great new Learning Management System (LMS) that’s on the market and decide to invest in it to deliver the content more effectively and boost employee engagement. However, course completion rates stay about the same. So was the problem really with the delivery platform? Did you need such a complex LMS or would a simpler solution (for example a WordPress plug-in LMS like LearnDash added to your existing WordPress website) work better, when coupled with updated course content? 

Deciding on a technology or software solution before fully evaluating your needs is tempting, but it often backfires. 

If you’re going to invest in technology, then it’s important to work with providers who will not push their products or an out-the-box solution before they’ve evaluated your specific context, any particular barriers you may be facing, and your overall needs. It’s also vital not to get carried away by “the latest thing” - even if it’s what your competitors are doing. 

Your challenge or need should always drive your technology and software choices, not the other way around. That’s why staying technology agnostic works.